Little Epistle: Setting Goals and Eating Elephants

More than a few years ago I sailed under the Golden Gate Bridge and into the open Pacific bound for the Tonga Islands.  The beautiful skyline of San Francisco disappeared slowly behind us and the open ocean spread out in every direction.  Night settled on us and blotted out any guidance.  One direction was as good as another to me.  Fortunately the captain and navigator had something more specific in mind.  Otherwise I might still be drifting in the open sea or long since wrecked on an unfriendly shore.

And such is the voyage of life.  Personal effective authorities and their research all agree that of the principles and practices that promote personal effectiveness, none is more important than setting goals.  It is the foundation of virtually every successful effort at self-improvement.  I don’t know anyone from personal association or historical research who has stumbled into a successful life.  Everybody I know who lives life well has at least the rudiments of goals to guide him or her.

If goals are so effective why do we so often dislike them?  Some very good reasons.  Often the goals have been assigned to us.  They are somebody else’s goals not ours.  Goals sometimes intimidate us.  They look too big for us to handle.  Perhaps our greatest hangup is that we don’t like to be measured.  We may come up short, and it may take effort to achieve what we have laid out for ourselves.

Try these antidotes for those spiritual illnesses.  Set out your own goals and have them supersede your assigned ones.  Break big indigestible goals down into little bite sized nibbles.  As the saying goes you can eat an elephant a bite at a time.

And finally start slow and easy. Especially at first, nibbling on a small succulent success is a lot more satisfying than choking on a heaped platter of failure.