You’ve heard the saying of course, the optimist sees the glass half full. The pessimist sees it half empty. It seems to me these days more folks are seeing it half empty than half full or if it is half full the contents are polluted or fattening.

But a few blue birds of happiness are still chirping. Hooray for them.

Between the two poles are the unsinkables, people who acknowledge the problems but are not crushed by them. My mother was one of those. “It could have been worse,” she said when the kitchen caught fire, and after various other setbacks.

I like the story of a grandmother who said this whenever something bad happened. Her grandchildren had heard that so often they decided to test her limits. At a family picnic they ran to her shouting. “Gramma little Herman done been carried off by the devil.”

Sure enough, she replied, “Coulda been worse.”

“Gramma, how could it be worse?”

“The devil coulda made Herman carry him.”

At least Little Herman got a free ride.

I assume that’s just a story, but I have one that tops it, and this one is true.

Elder LeGrand Richards was an apostle in the church for many years. He was also a survivor of the “slings and arrows of outrageous fortune” as Hamlet describes life. Elder Richards endured at least his share of life’s bumps and bruises, yet he remained an unsinkable optimist, or at least a “coulda been worseist”

Well into his later years I was asked to interview him, gather old photos and memorabilia and narrate and produce a documentary for television. When I talked with him he acknowledged he was pushing the envelope of mortality, but he was cheered by the good folks and experiences life had brought him and by the knowledge he would soon be with his beloved wife again.

A short time later because of his age and compromised blood circulation they had to amputate one of his feet. I’m sure he didn’t enjoy being on crutches for the rest of his life, but had a standard answer to his many friends who asked, “Elder Richards how are you doing?”

“Oh, I’m just glad they started on that end.”

That’s coulda been worse at its best.

You’ve heard the saying of course, the optimist sees the glass half full. The pessimist sees it half empty. It seems to me these days more folks are seeing it half empty than half full or if it is half full the contents are polluted or fattening.

But a few blue birds of happiness are still chirping. Hooray for them.

Between the two poles are the unsinkables, people who acknowledge the problems but are not crushed by them. My mother was one of those. “It could have been worse,” she said when the kitchen caught fire, and after various other setbacks.

I like the story of a grandmother who said this whenever something bad happened. Her grandchildren had heard that so often they decided to test her limits. At a family picnic they ran to her shouting. “Gramma little Herman done been carried off by the devil.”

Sure enough, she replied, “Coulda been worse.”

“Gramma, how could it be worse?”

“The devil coulda made Herman carry him.”

At least Little Herman got a free ride.

I assume that’s just a story, but I have one that tops it, and this one is true.

Elder LeGrand Richards was an apostle in the church for many years. He was also a survivor of the “slings and arrows of outrageous fortune” as Hamlet describes life. Elder Richards endured at least his share of life’s bumps and bruises, yet he remained an unsinkable optimist, or at least a “coulda been worseist”

Well into his later years I was asked to interview him, gather old photos and memorabilia and narrate and produce a documentary for television. When I talked with him he acknowledged he was pushing the envelope of mortality, but he was cheered by the good folks and experiences life had brought him and by the knowledge he would soon be with his beloved wife again.

A short time later because of his age and compromised blood circulation they had to amputate one of his feet. I’m sure he didn’t enjoy being on crutches for the rest of his life, but had a standard answer to his many friends who asked, “Elder Richards how are you doing?”

“Oh, I’m just glad they started on that end.”

That’s coulda been worse at its best.

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