Smart Money

Posted by: Duane Hiatt in Commentaries Add comments

Consider this sad story about so-called riches.

It’s about a man who lived among a primitive people.  His house servants watched him get things just by writing notes from his checkbook and giving them to people.  At length greed got the best of the servants.  They killed the man and stole his magic check book so they could get all the wonderful things it could buy.

What a tragedy.  A life traded for things of the world. But we see that all the time. Even more tragic, sometimes it’s our own life.  We ignore or are ignorant of the principles of celestial economics.  We spend time and money on corruptible commodities of earth and ignore the opportunities to invest in eternity.  Who of us would not give an honest tenth of his possessions and a generous donation of his time and money if he could be sure he would get in return a reward so great he couldn’t carry it home?

That is precisely what the Lord promises. “Bring ye all the tithes into the storehouse, that there may be meat in my house; and prove me now herewith, saith the Lord of Hosts, if I will not open you the windows of heaven, and pour you out a blessing that there shall not be room enough to receive it. (Malachi 3:10, 3 Nephi 24:10)

On the other hand, suppose our wildest dreams of acquisition and possession came true, and we owned the whole world?  “For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?” Jesus asked. (Mark 8:36)

It should be obvious that the smart money and the smart time would go for the larger and enduring return.  But too often.  We go for the quick reward, conspicuous consumption, something for nothing. These schemes are as popular as they ever were in this world.  Ultimately they are as unprofitable as stealing a checkbook.

Consider this sad story about so-called riches.

It’s about a man who lived among a primitive people.  His house servants watched him get things just by writing notes from his checkbook and giving them to people.  At length greed got the best of the servants.  They killed the man and stole his magic check book so they could get all the wonderful things it could buy.

What a tragedy.  A life traded for things of the world. But we see that all the time. Even more tragic, sometimes it’s our own life.  We ignore or are ignorant of the principles of celestial economics.  We spend time and money on corruptible commodities of earth and ignore the opportunities to invest in eternity.  Who of us would not give an honest tenth of his possessions and a generous donation of his time and money if he could be sure he would get in return a reward so great he couldn’t carry it home?

That is precisely what the Lord promises. “Bring ye all the tithes into the storehouse, that there may be meat in my house; and prove me now herewith, saith the Lord of Hosts, if I will not open you the windows of heaven, and pour you out a blessing that there shall not be room enough to receive it. (Malachi 3:10, 3 Nephi 24:10)

On the other hand, suppose our wildest dreams of acquisition and possession came true, and we owned the whole world?  “For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?” Jesus asked. (Mark 8:36)

It should be obvious that the smart money and the smart time would go for the larger and enduring return.  But too often.  We go for the quick reward, conspicuous consumption, something for nothing. These schemes are as popular as they ever were in this world.  Ultimately they are as unprofitable as stealing a checkbook.

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