Hands that See

Posted by: Duane Hiatt in Commentaries Add comments

HANDS THAT SEE

In that classic movie in 1939, The Wizard of Oz. The plot revolves around things the characters want. The scarecrow wants a brain. The lion wants courage. The tin man wants a heart. Dorothy wants to fly over the rainbow.

I suppose the movie is unforgettable because most of us at some times want something more than we have. When I get that want mood, try to remember true stories like this one.

A number of years ago back in Missouri a night patrolling policeman stopped to check out a suspicious looking scene.  A car was parked on the dark street and a man was working underneath it.  The cop naturally suspected somebody was pilfering parts.  He called the man out from under the car and got one of the bigger surprises of his career I think.  The midnight mechanic was a multi-talented young medical student.  He was fixing his car because like most students he was on a tight budget and didn’t want to pay a garage.  Also he was very handy with his hands, had been since the days he grew up on the farm in southern Utah.  Mechanical work was a refreshing break for him from the mental grind of medical studies.

But why in the dark?  The young medical student explained to the policeman, “Because I’m not handicapped like you and most other people. You have to have light to see things.” I can see with my hands.

The policeman saw the light, so to speak. Got in his car and went to his patrolling shaking his head in amusement.

The medical student/mechanic went back to his fixing his car in the dark. He had learned to see with his hands and fingers since he lost his sight in a childhood accident.

The policeman is one of a long line of people who were amazed at what this man could see and do with his hands.

He was a high school wrestler, played a little guitar and musical saw for recreation, raised a fine family and contributed to his church and community.  His BYU graduating class of 1936 honored him as its most successful student.  He was featured in a verse of a song by Janice Kapp Perry titled “The Test.”  He has blessed the lives of thousands through his long career.

But this remarkable man saw with more than his hands.  He saw with his mind, and heart. With these he gained his insights into life and how to live it to the fullest despite, or perhaps because of challenges.  We are privileged to have known this good man could see without sight, Dr. Iliff Jeffery.

HANDS THAT SEE

In that classic movie in 1939, The Wizard of Oz. The plot revolves around things the characters want. The scarecrow wants a brain. The lion wants courage. The tin man wants a heart. Dorothy wants to fly over the rainbow.

I suppose the movie is unforgettable because most of us at some times want something more than we have. When I get that want mood, try to remember true stories like this one.

A number of years ago back in Missouri a night patrolling policeman stopped to check out a suspicious looking scene.  A car was parked on the dark street and a man was working underneath it.  The cop naturally suspected somebody was pilfering parts.  He called the man out from under the car and got one of the bigger surprises of his career I think.  The midnight mechanic was a multi-talented young medical student.  He was fixing his car because like most students he was on a tight budget and didn’t want to pay a garage.  Also he was very handy with his hands, had been since the days he grew up on the farm in southern Utah.  Mechanical work was a refreshing break for him from the mental grind of medical studies.

But why in the dark?  The young medical student explained to the policeman, “Because I’m not handicapped like you and most other people. You have to have light to see things.” I can see with my hands.

The policeman saw the light, so to speak. Got in his car and went to his patrolling shaking his head in amusement.

The medical student/mechanic went back to his fixing his car in the dark. He had learned to see with his hands and fingers since he lost his sight in a childhood accident.

The policeman is one of a long line of people who were amazed at what this man could see and do with his hands.

He was a high school wrestler, played a little guitar and musical saw for recreation, raised a fine family and contributed to his church and community.  His BYU graduating class of 1936 honored him as its most successful student.  He was featured in a verse of a song by Janice Kapp Perry titled “The Test.”  He has blessed the lives of thousands through his long career.

But this remarkable man saw with more than his hands.  He saw with his mind, and heart. With these he gained his insights into life and how to live it to the fullest despite, or perhaps because of challenges.  We are privileged to have known this good man could see without sight, Dr. Iliff Jeffery.

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