Epistle: Living is Giving

Posted by: Duane Hiatt in Little Epistles Add comments

The lawyer was to all appearances an upright citizen, a faithful observer of the Mosaic Law. He was assertive, but that’s not an uncommon nor unforgivable trait in lawyers. His bigger problem was in expecting to use his legal expertise to argue his way into the kingdom of heaven. Jesus first pointed out to him the difference between the hair splitting legalities of humans and the sublimely simple system of the Lord. There are only two great laws; love the Lord, and love your neighbor.

The lawyer still seeking salvation through argumentation saw a loophole. “Who is my neighbor?” he asked. But Jesus turned his escape hatch into an infinitely open door to godlike service. He told the lawyer the story of the Good Samaritan.

The story contains many truths on many levels. But the truly sublime and celestial symbolism of the Samaritan comes in his simple words as he pays the inn keeper for the injured man’s lodging. “If it costs more, when I come again I will repay thee.” This is not a singular experience for this good man. He has not gone out of his way to help another. This is his way. He has purposely left his account open ended. Whatever it costs to serve another he will pay.

In this interpretation he is not just a good neighbor. He is a Christ symbol.

The lawyer was seeking the minimum requirements for salvation, the narrowest definition of neighbor that would qualify him for the kingdom. Jesus’ instead showed him that citizenship in the celestial kingdom comes not from a set of rules, but from a set of the heart. As it is in heaven so it is on earth. To live is to give. To the lawyer and to us the Lord offers the invitation, “This do and thou shalt live.”(Luke 10:28)

The lawyer was to all appearances an upright citizen, a faithful observer of the Mosaic Law. He was assertive, but that’s not an uncommon nor unforgivable trait in lawyers. His bigger problem was in expecting to use his legal expertise to argue his way into the kingdom of heaven. Jesus first pointed out to him the difference between the hair splitting legalities of humans and the sublimely simple system of the Lord. There are only two great laws; love the Lord, and love your neighbor.

The lawyer still seeking salvation through argumentation saw a loophole. “Who is my neighbor?” he asked. But Jesus turned his escape hatch into an infinitely open door to godlike service. He told the lawyer the story of the Good Samaritan.

The story contains many truths on many levels. But the truly sublime and celestial symbolism of the Samaritan comes in his simple words as he pays the inn keeper for the injured man’s lodging. “If it costs more, when I come again I will repay thee.” This is not a singular experience for this good man. He has not gone out of his way to help another. This is his way. He has purposely left his account open ended. Whatever it costs to serve another he will pay.

In this interpretation he is not just a good neighbor. He is a Christ symbol.

The lawyer was seeking the minimum requirements for salvation, the narrowest definition of neighbor that would qualify him for the kingdom. Jesus’ instead showed him that citizenship in the celestial kingdom comes not from a set of rules, but from a set of the heart. As it is in heaven so it is on earth. To live is to give. To the lawyer and to us the Lord offers the invitation, “This do and thou shalt live.”(Luke 10:28)

One Response to “Epistle: Living is Giving”

  1. Duane Hiatt Says:

    Great post
    Jeanie